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How to Improve Your Memory and Increase Your Brain Health

How to Improve Your Memory and Increase Your Brain Health

I have read quite a bit of information pertaining to brain health, memory loss, and memory enhancement. I am going to list a general consensus of the top 5 ways on how to improve your memory and increase your brain health. These are confirmed by the Alzheimer’s Assoc., Psychology Today, brainhealth.gov and the AARP. They are in no particular order.

Healthy Diet

Exercise

Sleep

how to Improve Your Memory and

 Social Engagement

  Keeping Your Brain Active

HEALTHY DIET

Wherever you turn these days, there is a new diet being advertised. I am not going to advertise one here! Instead, I am going to appeal to what you already know. But please remember that a healthy diet rich in Omega 3’s is one of the best ways to increase memory and improve brain function.

  • Fruits and vegetables are tops.how to Improve Your Memory and
  • Whole grains, seeds, and nuts (easy on the nuts) are healthy.
  • Fish and poultry (mostly) and lean meats (occasionally) in 4 oz. portions are great protein sources.
  • Healthy fats like olive & coconut oil and organic butter (sparingly) are good.
  • A fish (krill) oil supplement is recommended to improve your memory. See my pick here.
  • NO soda! (One of the worst things to put into your body) regular OR diet.
  • Fried foods, chips, candy, alcohol – you know the list – are not good for you. ONCE in a WHILE in tiny doses if you must.

EXERCISE

how to Improve Your Memory andWe know this right? It’s a must ladies and it doesn’t have to be hard. I mean, did you read my blog on Laughter? It’s exercise!! That’s right. Anyway, you have to find something you enjoy that engages your body. Walking, gardening, yoga, cycling etc. are a few examples. It is particularly beneficial to get your heart rate up a bit because it increases blood flow to the brain. Brain health is what we want here right?

SLEEPhow to Improve Your Memory and

Your body rejuvenates while you sleep, and this includes your brain. Your brain ‘resets’ while you sleep, allowing you to gain fresh insight into problems and increasing your creativity. Your memory is enhanced, even by just 4 to 6 hours of good, sound sleep. Sleep tight!

SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT

how to Improve Your Memory andIt is good for your brain for you to be involved with other people. Volunteering brings feelings of happiness and well-being, increasing brain health. Social activities are linked to reduced risk for some health problems, including dementia.

 

KEEPING YOUR BRAIN ACTIVE

There are many ways to keep your brain active. One way is to continue learning. This is high on the list of increasing brain health. Finishing your degree, taking a class, reading abook, attending a seminar etc. are just a few examples. Here are some courses that may interest you. 

So there you have it! A healthy diet, some exercise, good sleep, social activity, and learning new things are a few ways answering how to improve your memory and increase your brain health! 

Remember girls, a little change can make a big difference! 

Thrive! OK? ….. how to Improve Your Memory

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RobinRichPersonalitySergioLauren KinghornKrisRecent comment authors
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RichPersonality
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RichPersonality

It’s really important to have good memory, and like you said there are few ways to improve memory, i would like to point out the importance of learning foreign language. At least for me it was very important step in my life, and i noticed that during the learning process my memory improved a lot. Great article, thanks for sharing.

Sergio
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Sergio

Hi Robin. Reading your post was very reassuring, as it looks like I’m already doing most things right. The most difficult part for me is the healthy diet, because it is not easy to convince my family to stop, or at least reduce, the consumption of unhealthy food, especially sweets, and it is not so easy to eat in a different way than them. I’ll have them read your article, who knows that it may do the miracle 🙂

Robin
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Robin

I totally understand. It is hard when those around you on a daily basis are going in a different direction. I believe the most important thing is to live life the way you know is right for you. Others can come along or not, but you should do your walk through life, no excuses 🙂 I appreciate you stopping by Sergio, and by all means, share articles as much as you’d like! Take Care, Robin

Lauren Kinghorn
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Lauren Kinghorn

Hi Robin, lovely post, thanks. My Dad has Lewy Body Syndrome, which is most like Parkinsons in it’s end stages, but also shares some Alzheimers symptoms. It has been so sad to see someone who has been a Presbyterian Minister for most of his life, a Pillar in the community, become so frail and withdrawn so quickly. He retreats into himself more each day. We do find when he manages to exercise (walking to the gate of the retirement home and back 3 or 4 times a day), his symptoms are a little better, but unfortunately one of the symptoms… Read more »

Robin
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Robin

Hi Laura, So sorry to hear about your Dad. It is so tough to watch a parent go through these things. We can only make suggestions and pray right? The link I put in the article for krill oil is something I take personally. There are no ‘fish burps’ and I notice when I’m not taking it. They run specials quite often; so I usually wait and order 6 at a time. I pray your Dad will be infused with Holy Ghost Caring! Blessings, Robin

Marcus
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Marcus

Thanks for this great post. My mom have long said that she wanted to improve her memory so I said that I would try and help her with getting some information on the Internet. Some of the things that you listed here felt obvious and should be implemented directly. I think the lack of sleep might be one of the most important one. Isn’t 4 to 6 hours too little or it’s personal maybe? I have heard 8 hours a day. Also my mom doesn’t really like fish so she don’t get the right omega 3’s. Can you easily just… Read more »

Robin
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Robin

Hi Marcus! So good of you to look out for your mom like you do. There really are a lot of people who don’t like fish. I put a link in the article for an Omega 3 supplement. I have been taking it now for nearly 4 years, and obviously I’m pleased with the product. The company has excellent customer service and spend a great deal on research. Actually, most health experts insist upon an Omega 3 supplement for optimum health!

Kris
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Kris

Hi there Robin,
What a gorgeous site! You are so correct with your tips for improving memory and brain function. One thing I totally advocate for is continued learning and experience. you are never too old to learn new tricks and skills. Do a course. Learn a language. Do a cooking course, whatever. An idle mind is the devil’s workshop, and the devil’s name is Alzheimer’s!!!
Thanks for sharing, kris

Robin
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Robin

Thanks for coming by Kris! My mom had Alzheimer’s and though she played games on the computer day and night, she didn’t do different things to engage other parts of her brain. Social interaction is very important as is a good diet. She wouldn’t stop smoking either. All we can do is encourage people to do the right things, and then leave them to their choices. It’s hard to watch sometimes. I really miss my mom. Thanks for commenting on the site! Blessings, Robin

Cathy
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Cathy

Hi there Robin,

Although I’ve not yet reach 50, I could see that my memory capabilities are lacking due to constant lack of sleep.

Ever since starting my online business, I get so carried away with my blog until late at night and because I am already at home, my mind doesn’t tell me to clock out. All the long hours in front of the PC screen puts straining to the eyes as well.

Sleep is important – thanks for reminding me that – not just to improve our memory, but also to make us more productive.

Robin
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Robin

I can so relate. I’m excited about this website also and because I still work full time, I work on it at night… causing my mind to spin and getting myself overtired. There’s mixed reviews about drinking red wine late at night also which really saddens me hahaha! Anyway, we just keep trying to do our best and find what works for us, helping us to thrive in these years. Thanks for stopping by Cathy… Blessings!

Elmarie
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Elmarie

Hi Robin. Yip growing old takes courage. I remember when we were kids 50 seems so old but now that you are actually there – well you are only as old as you feel. I try to live healthy with daily exercising and getting enough sleep. Trying to eat healthy but sometimes the cravings for “unhealthy” food wins the battle.
Really good advice.

Robin
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Robin

Hi Elmarie! Thanks for stopping by and reading the post. I know what you mean about the ‘unhealthy’ food winning the battle. Moderation is important as sugar can be addicting. At least it is for me! It’s something I’m always tweaking…. and hopefully will be well into the latter years!

Chris
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Chris

Funnily enough my uncle ( around the age of 82 now ) has been looking into this recently due to his lapses – lovely chap but his health is starting to catch up with him now! He claims that sleep is key time for your brain to solidify the connections between neurons – something he took on from a PDF recently! Do you agree with this?

Robin
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Robin

Totally! Sleep is one of the most beneficial things for any one really, but in particular those of us heading into the 50 and above years. So many amazing things happen while you sleep including practicing things that you learn during the day. In other words, it improves your memory. The amount of sleep you get affects your mind, body and soul. It prolongs life too! Your uncle may have many more years if he continues to educate himself and practice what he learns. Well, time for me to take a nap! Thanks for stopping by.

Rosanne
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Rosanne

For diet, I’d like to share some plant foods that might help.

Lion’s mane mushroom and ginkgo are great brain foods. Lion’s mane mushroom actually helps you to rebuild and maintain the wiring inside. I get dried lion’s mane mushroom from traditional Chinese medicine shops and cook a chicken soup with it. But it’s not common in some places I think?

There are products out there that contain these plant foods, maybe those interested can Google for them.

Robin
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Robin

Hi Rosanne! Thanks for your suggestions and I’m interested in lion’s mane mushroom. I’ve never heard of it before and I am a huge mushroom fan! Take care and thanks for commenting…